Pedestrian deaths hit 30-year high according to new report

SUVs, smartphones and a spike in the number of people walking are some of the factors that could be presenting increased hazards for pediatricians in Texas and elsewhere in the country. This is the big takeaway from the most recent Governors Highway Safety Association report. Perhaps the most startling statistic is that more than 6,000 people traveling by foot lost their lives in 2018, the highest figure reported since 1990.

Pedestrians are more likely to experience some type of personal injury at night. In fact, nighttime crashes account for more than 90 percent of the spike in pedestrian fatalities over the past decade. The GHSA report also states that the number of SUVs involved in fatal accidents involving people on foot is up 50 percent from 2013. A separate report suggests that SUVs, which now account for the majority of all vehicles sold in the U.S., with higher front-end profiles are more likely to fatally affect pedestrians when accidents occur.

Another reason for the increase in pedestrian deaths, according to the report, could be the fact that certain cities and states are becoming more populated. This means there are more people walking, which increases the risk of accidents. Lastly, the GHSA points the finger at the surge in smartphone use as another reason for their findings, suggesting there are more distractions contributing to accidents. The report's author stresses the need for enforcement and safety education campaigns to make it safer for motorists and pedestrians to co-exist.

Even when a pedestrian doesn't sustain a fatal personal injury, a lawyer may be able to make a case for negligence on the part of a driver. This determination usually involves witness interviews along with a review of cellphone data and investigation reports. With fatal pedestrian accidents, an attorney might suggest pursuing a wrongful death lawsuit.

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