Drivers in the Lone Star State can have a need for speed. Sadly, that could be a contributing factor to Texas’ high crash fatality rates. The state hasn’t seen a day go by in 20 years where someone didn’t die on its roads.

Between 2010 and 2018, more people were killed on Texas roads than in any other state in the country, even California, which has a higher population.

Leading causes of driving deaths

These are some of the most common, according to the report:

  • Driving under the influence: In Texas, crashes involving drugs and alcohol accounted for nearly 35% of all driver fatalities in 2010, but those numbers have since gone down to around 25%.
  • Driving above the speed limit: In many parts of Texas, the maximum speed limit for motorists is 85mph. Even in urban areas, the maximum speed limit is 75 mph. If drivers are going above the speed limit in any capacity, especially if they’re distracted, they could put themselves and others in grave danger.
  • Lane sizes in rural areas: More than half of the state’s road fatalities occur in rural areas. That may be due to how the roads in those parts of the state are set up. Many of them have narrow lanes that go in opposite directions. That, combined with higher posted speed limits, can lead to severe injuries or death.

Texans value their freedoms and liberties. But when a loved one dies due to the negligence of another driver, it can be difficult for families to cope with these unexpected losses. If that’s the case, families may want to seek compensation from the person responsible for their loved one’s untimely death.